NFL Aaron Hernandez autopsy

middle-age American living in New Jersey near the Lincoln Tunnel «« Aaron Hernandez’s autopsy report was released and in the local headlines yesterday. He played for the Patriots and killed himself in prison, and the tragedy of the story is extensive. Those close to him have to reconcile knowing the pounding as a football player and eventually NFL player contributed to his crimes and suicide. Like a lot of people who shoot up with wealth and fame it leads to premature and tragic death, and Aaron took a couple of other lives through murder along the way to his grave. DPRK is known to feed people to hungry dogs who kill the victim while an audience watches. The hermit country that hides much publicizes this gross event like here in the US executions are witnessed. The Romans fed people to lions, and although there is lag time as an NFL fan I watch these games knowing some of the players are beating themselves to a slow and indignified death. Aaron’s track to the grave was faster, and is written in the autopsy report as one of the most severe repeated-head-pounding injuries ever seen. As the science stands today what was learned about Aaron can only be learned through autopsy, so more autopsy will eventually move the NFL by moving its fans. Knowing of Aaron’s fall from superstar to convict is ugly knowing I enjoy the sport that pounded his head in the direction of murder, convict, prison, and suicide is also ugly. »» about me 302-990-2346 contact us

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denial is risky . . sometimes

middle-age American living in New Jersey near the Lincoln Tunnel «« Several pings prompted this text about loss: ONE: Taylor Conroy’s fresh post on TED youtube TWO: Noel my Puerto Rico barrio amigo who tells me about his house on the island . . . . no roof THREE: Adam and I inspired by Noel recalled our time in the call center when people would tell us they had a computer though not working FOUR: inspired by these aforementioned accounts Hana reminded me how my cousin Brian told us about his swimming pool . . . . no water FIVE: me answering the question from my passengers as a pedicab driver ¿How many kids? As a pedicab driver I forced myself to answer the kid-count question precisely . . “I was a father of three . . now two”, and I also credit this repeated exchange to helping me think, say, and feel the reality of David’s death. It should be noted a therapist in the weeks after David’s death told me I was not in denial ¿How can you tell? I asked, and she said the way I described my hat being used in the coffin to hide the head injury that lead to David’s death. I knew denial was a common tripping point in recovery from the death of a loved one, and in the weeks following David’s death I sensed I had already passed a test, and the pedicab thing helped me continue my progress. I’m also comparing significant denial with much-less significant denial. Brian’s pool without water or Noel’s house without a roof, are these men ¿Denying loss? I am sure I don’t know. The house minus roof and pool minus water point to denial, but it could mean nothing. Brian is in San Diego, and I have another cousin in Minnesota. If conversation with Julie prior to my visit explored a pool, and she mentioned, “Tommy, yes we have a pool, but it’s an outdoor pool”. Assuming it’s out-of-service status was seasonal, then a pool that’s closed for the season is like Brian’s pool that’s out of water. Both pools have temporary closures. In addition I have reason to believe Noel has plans to replace the roof on his Puerto Rico brick house. Taylor speaks of loss in much the same way I think about loss. Each of us pound our chest about healthy recovery from loss, but each of us are in denial about something like the most recent pair of sunglasses I broke and trashed on a walk along Manhattan’s Riverside Park. Hana’s inquiry about me suffering the balance of the walk while squinting was responded with denial. Hana inquired the next day prompted by my replacement glasses, and again my response indicates sun-glasses-loss denial . . denial is risky . . . sometimes. »» about me 302-990-2346 contact us

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membership ¿Revoked?

middle-age American living in New Jersey near the Lincoln Tunnel «« Dear Brogan: I’ll never know the full extend of what happened in family between the moment it seemed I got four exwives: Angie Ellen Ann Marty, but it was epic and its end was marked by this. I have to believe family felt some level of trauma as to the level of trauma attempted to be foisted upon me. It played out like my childhood. I was at the center of the storm yet spared. Ironically I compare these aforementioned events to Meg’s text to you . . . . not the first one . . . the second one. I have reason to think your thoughts went something like this: “oh shit it’s family . . . “. So here at, “La Gran Via” one of my favorite places for emotional inspiration on a rainy Tuesday I tap away a sense of kinship with you. In each of our family events family said, “you’re not meeting expectations”. Yours got reconciled in a flash and mine a decade. Here’s the cool part . . . neither of us jeopardized our family membership. On the occasion of Ryan’s baptism you sampled my social and family life in the town where David is buried, and the line between friends and family blurred for me. The blurred line clarified when my community membership was revoked, and my family membership wasn’t. In parallel to my decade in the barrel ran the realization of your dad’s importance in our family. While centered with Ann and my mom there was a force trying to convince themselves your dad’s family membership had been revoked. It wasn’t; it can’t be, and I’ll always be grateful for how Nelson performed at my dark moments following the death of David. There is risk the uplifting spirit of this text got lost, so . . . . . family is forever; you know it; I know it; Meg knows it. I’m happy about how your baby news triggered this emotional moment at La Gran Via . . from NJ2¿CA? ciao U. Tommy »» about me 302-990-2346 contact us

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Hermes Kelly Hermes Birkin ¿Now?

middle-age American living in New Jersey near the Lincoln Tunnel «« Hermes has played with supply to jack demand of the Hermes Birkin and Hermes Kelly, and their tactics include waiting lists, which run contra to capitalism. Capitalism is alive in Soho, and Hana at Bloomingdale’s can get these bags without delay. »» about me 302-990-2346 contact us

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Suu Kyi is hot

middle-age American living in New Jersey near the Lincoln Tunnel «« Suu Kyi has negative press and they shortened her name like Trump did with Rocket Man. Though it was easier to say when she won the peace prize, and harder to say now . . Suu Kyi is hot. »» about me 302-990-2346 contact us

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Hillary and Sean

middle-age American living in New Jersey near the Lincoln Tunnel «« Trump’s lies are not laughable, but Hollywood embraced Trump’s lying face, Sean Spicer, which attracted objection. Violence against women is horrible, and Trump’s Hillary-golf-ball tweet was described and an affront to women. The line between reality and entertainment has never been so blurred, but Trump’s golf ball and Sean’s mockery of himself were clearly entertainment. Both controversies passed in agreement with my first reaction, which is Trump did not hit a woman deliberately with a golf ball and Sean did not continue to convince us fiction was non-fiction. Both were entertainment. Golf ball: bad taste; Sean: good taste. »» about me 302-990-2346 contact us

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acid hate

middle-age American living in New Jersey near the Lincoln Tunnel «« Four Boston College students were randomly-chosen victims of an acid attack at a Versailles France train station. The accounts I’ve read give few details, but if this attack is anything like previous acid attacks in Europe . . . Allah help us. The victims I know of in years of reading these occasional Europe acid attacks left the victims permanently disfigured in their faces. It could have been worse . . they could have been killed . . yet there’s something even more vicious and hate filled at the root of these acid attacks. As an American understanding the age and gender of the victims I conclude after a headline scan it was truly random and not provoked while the history of Europe acid attacks left me hanging onto a trace of sense the victims knew their attackers. The victims were chosen by nothing more than a passing glance and access to their faces. Decades before terrorist attacks had any claims of Islam US terrorists learned their political statement had to be tied to mass death, big damage, and preferably icons of societal establishment, but these acid attacks splash into the headlines and disappear, which is the reverse of what US terrorist learned decades ago. This is probably the first time I’ve written about acid attacks, and the topic is not likely to be revisited by me as it will vanish from the headlines leaving four college-age women permanently scarred. The existence of hate saddens me. »» about me 302-990-2346 contact us

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